Recommendations And Information On
Astronomy Telescopes Reflectors



On this page about astronomy telescopes, reflectors are the topic. Reflectors, as the name implies, use mirrors to gather the light from the aperture and reflect it to the eyepiece.

The eyepiece is often located near the front or top of the scope giving the reflector a strange look and way of use to those new to astronomy telescopes.

Some of the benefits of a reflector type scope follow.

Reflectors generally have the lowest cost per inch(or millimeter) of aperture. So for the same cost as the other types of telescopes you can get a larger aperture or objective lens size.

Having a larger objective lens allows your astronomy telescope to gather more light so you can see more objects. This will allow you to view deep-sky objects such as nebulae and star clusters.

Of course reflectors are good for viewing the planets and moons in our solar system, producing bright images.

Reflector telescopes do need to be aligned sometimes to keep the mirrors in correct reflecting position. This is known as collimation and is a fairly simple procedure.

Reflectors also need to be cleaned more often than their cousins.

Here are some options for your first astronomy telescope if you have decided on a reflector:

FunScope 76mm Reflector Telescope

FunScope 76mm Reflector Telescope

Fun indeed! You'll enjoy hours of stellar exploration with this amazing little telescope. Designed specifically with youngsters and first-time telescope buyers in mind, the FunScope is a great way to "test the waters" of stargazing - affordably! The FunScope features a 76mm polished spherical mirror, allowing you to capture 60 percent; more light than a typical 60mm beginner's telescope. So you can observe the Moon, Saturn's rings, as well as Jupiter and its four brightest moons, all under light-polluted skies. Under dark skies, even star clusters, emission nebulae and some of the brighter galaxies are not beyond reach. Weighing just 4 lbs., the ultra-portable FunScope can go with you just about anywhere! It makes a great gift. Who knew so much fun could come in such a small package? See for yourself!



Orion SkyScanner 100mm TableTop Reflector

Orion SkyScanner 100mm TableTop Reflector

Although perfect for beginning stargazers, this telescope is not a toy! The Orion SkyScanner 100mm TableTop Reflector is just the right size - large enough to see night sky objects yet compact enough to sit on a desk. The wide field of vision is ideal for observing detailed moon craters and even the spectacular rings of Saturn without having to leave town. Under darker skies, the SkySkanner has enough light-gathering power to reveal objects as deep as the Milky Way. Complete with 100mm parabolic primary mirror optics made of glass not plastic, two 1.25" eyepieces, and an EZ finder II reflex sight, this 100mm reflector provides up to 40x magnification out of the box and collects over 200 times more light than the unaided eye!



Orion StarBlast 4.5 Equatorial Reflector Telescope

Orion StarBlast 4.5 Equatorial Reflector Telescope

Here it is, the StarBlast 4.5 EQ. It's bound to become a favorite of both adults and adolescents alike. It combines the much-heralded StarBlast wide-field (f/4.0) parabolic optics with a sturdy, adjustable height EQ-1 equatorial tracking mount. So if you're an adult (or a parent) looking for an exceptional starter scope on a tracking mount, or an experienced amateur astronomer seeking a more portable alternative to your "light bucket," then get a StarBlast 4.5 EQ. The name says it all!



Orion SpaceProbe 130 EQ Reflector Telescope

Orion SpaceProbe 130 EQ Reflector Telescope

Without doubt, the SpaceProbe 130 Newtonian strikes a classy pose, from its glossy black aluminum tube right down to its 6x30 finder scope. It's a telescope that's sure to attract serious beginners. But a great telescope is more than how it looks - it's how it looks at the stars, and here the SpaceProbe 130 provides great viewing performance. This scope's 130mm (5.1") primary mirror gathers enough light for deep-sky observing while its 900mm focal length (f/6.9) provides the resolving power needed to reveal subtle planetary features. With the two fully coated Explorer II eyepieces provided (25mm and 10mm) you can cruise the Orion Nebula and the ringed visage of Saturn.


With reflector scopes a shorter focal length, basically the length of the tube, gives a wider field of view. So you see more of the sky at one time.

Use shorter tubes for deep sky observing, and longer tubes for viewing the moon and planets. However remember that shorter tubes can cause increased aberrations so keep the power magnification under 100 times.

View the pages on refractors and catadioptics astronomy telescopes before deciding what type is right for you.

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